Become a Machinist (CNC Machine Operator)

Machinists, tools and die makers set up and operate a variety of (CNC) computer-controlled or mechanically-controlled machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments, and tools. More »

Become a Plumber

Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters install and repair pipes that carry water, steam, air, or other liquids or gases to and in businesses, homes, and factories. More »

Become a Welder

Welders, cutters, solderers, and brazers weld or join metal parts. They also fill holes, indentions, or seams of metal products, using hand-held welding equipment. More »

Become a HVAC Technician

HVAC technicians repair, inspect and maintain heating, cooling, and refrigeration systems. Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers—often referred to as HVACR technicians—work on heating, ventilation, cooling, and refrigeration systems that control More »

Become an Electrician

Electricians install and maintain electrical systems in homes, businesses, and factories. Almost every building has an electrical system that is installed during construction and maintained after that. Electricians do both the installing More »

 

How to Become a Machinist in 5 Steps

How to become a machinist in 5 steps

A machinist is responsible for creating precise metal, wood or plastic parts. Read further to learn how you can gain experience working with metal properties and mechanics. Check out a 5-step career path to becoming a machinist, and learn about advancement opportunities in this field.

How to Become a Welder in 5 Steps

How to Become a Welder in 5 Steps

A welder is a skilled tradesmen who specializes in the precise application of heat to melt or weld pieces of metal together. You may weld steel structural beams used in buildings or bridges, pipes used in refineries, and pipelines or various components used in machinery

How to Become a HVAC Technician in 5 Steps

How to Become an HVAC Installer in 5 Steps

HVAC technicians install and repair heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment and systems. Learn the education options of a HVAC technician as well as training information and licensure requirements.

Job Openings in the Skilled Trades Continues to Grow

Lack of Workers in the Skilled Trades Continues to Grow

America’s Skilled Trades Dilemma: Shortages Loom As Most-In-Demand Group Of Workers Ages

For the last three years, according to ManpowerGroup, the hardest segment of the workforce for employers to staff with skilled talent hasn’t been registered nurses or engineers or even web developers. It’s been the skilled trades – the welders, electricians, machinists, etc. that are so prevalent in manufacturing and construction.

How to Become a Electrician in 4 Steps

The 4 Steps to Become an Electrician

Step # 1 Learn what an Electrician Does

The first step to learn How To Become An Electrician will be to understand what your new job entails. It will vary depending on what type of work you want to do,  for example residential or commercial work. It will be important to join a field you are interested in and enjoy. This may be a career you are in for the rest of your life and you need to make sure its something you want to do and enjoy!

A College Degree: Is It Really Worth the Money?

college degree worth the money?

It’s common wisdom: a college degree might be expensive, but it’s worth the money.  This is backed up by College Board statistics cited whenever the media discusses the issue: the average college graduate makes approximately $20,000 more per year than the average high school graduate.  Over time, this adds up to about $1 million more in the bank for college grads than for high school grads.

Why College May Not Be Right For YOU

Is college a scam?

In his recent blog ‘The College Scam’, consumer advocate John Stossel exposes the myth that a college education is an automatic pathway to make a lot of money and a great career for all who can get that all-important degree.

Why College May Not Be the Best Choice for Your Education Dollar

Trade School vs College

by Bruce Watson Aug 9th 2013

The traditional route to career success follows a pretty straight academic line: hard work in elementary school, followed by hard work in high school, followed by hard work at the best college you can afford. Vocational education, on the other hand, is often treated as a consolation prize — the second-best option for the second-best kids. But for a new generation facing rising college tuitions and high post-graduate unemployment, old-fashioned vocational studies might offer the best chance at a solid career and a lifetime free of debt.

Become a Machinist (CNC Machine Operator)

Become a Machinist (CNC Machine Operator)

Machinists, tools and die makers set up and operate a variety of (CNC) computer-controlled or mechanically-controlled machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments, and tools.

How to Become a Machinist, (CNC Machine Operator)

How to Become a Machinist

Machinists train in apprenticeship programs, vocational schools, or community or technical colleges, or informally on the job. To become a fully trained tool and die maker takes 4 or 5 years of technical instruction and on-the-job training. Good math, problem-solving, and computer skills are important.